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Contact: Email: alexk@csemn.org

Phone: (651) 917-0073 Ext.2241

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Monday - Friday
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News

Thank you for reading CSE Media Center's news section. Expect this section to be updated regularly with announcements, event details, information on new arrivals, and stories from CSE classrooms.

Celebrate "Banned Books Week" September 26-October 2

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week 2021 will be held September 26 – October 2. The theme of this year’s event is “Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.”

The majority of this year's most-banned books list are titles that address racism and racial justice, LGBTQ+ rights, as well as those that shared the stories of Black, Indigenous, or people of color.(bannedbooksweek.org). At CSE we believe it is important to highlight diverse voices in the education experience, particularly voices that are most often silenced. Join us in our celebration of Banned Books week by reading one of this year's most banned titles, which can be found below. Also, check out our list of banned books from the past for further reading.

Most banned books in 2020-2021
**Recommended only for mature readers.


George by Alex Gino. Challenged, banned, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, conflicting with a religious viewpoint, and not reflecting “the values of our community.”

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds. Banned and challenged because of the author’s public statements and because of claims that the book contains “selective storytelling incidents” and does not encompass racism against all people.

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely. Banned and challenged for profanity, drug use, and alcoholism and because it was thought to promote antipolice views, contain divisive topics, and be “too much of a sensitive matter right now.”

**Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. Banned, challenged, and restricted because it was thought to contain a political viewpoint, it was claimed to be biased against male students, and it included rape and profanity.

**The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and allegations of sexual misconduct on the part of the author.

Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story about Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin. Challenged for “divisive language” and because it was thought to promote anti-police views.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Banned and challenged for racial slurs and their negative effect on students, featuring a “white savior” character, and its perception of the Black experience.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Banned and challenged for racial slurs and racist stereotypes and their negative effect on students.

**The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison. Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and depicts child sexual abuse.

**The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. Challenged for profanity, and because it was thought to promote an anti-police message.

Latinx & Hispanic Heritage Month begins Sept 15

September 15 to October 15 is celebrated nationwide as National Latinx & Hispanic Heritage Month. It traditionally honors the cultures and contributions of both Hispanic and Latino Americans as we celebrate heritage rooted in all Latin American countries. Hispanic refers to a person who is from, or a descendant of someone who is from, a Spanish-speaking country. Latino/a or Latinx refers to a person who is from, or a descendant of someone who is from, a country in Latin America (NPS.gov).

During this month and throughout the year, CSE celebrates the history, heritage, and accomplishments of Hispanic and Latino Americans of past and present. To explore titles related to Latinx & Hispanic heritage, check out our Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month BookList.

Yang Warriors Live Event (In Case You Missed It!)

Hmong Studies Section

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Volunteer at the CSE Media Center!

The CSE Media Center welcomes volunteers! Volunteers may assist with administrative library tasks (eg. re-shelving, managing the collection, assisting student patrons), read to students, or help keep the library clean and inviting. Volunteers may assist on a regular schedule (preferred) or on a limited, drop-in basis. Volunteer shifts are available Monday-Friday from 8:30 am-4:30. To learn more about volunteer opportunities, please contact Alex Karpicke at: alexk@csemn.org